Tag Archive for IPV

HBV and risk management

I was invited to present at a side-panel being held at the fifty-seventh session of the Commission on the Status of Women taking place at the United Nations Headquarters in New York from 4 to 15 March 2013 by a Canadian team featuring Aruna Papp amongst others.
The time and the notice were rather short, and I decided that since the rest of the speakers would be speaking as representatives of NGOs, it would be a good time to sound like as much like a criminologist as I could, and talk not just about how we can draw on differences between kinds of violence, but to suggest an applying an integrative risk management approach, which would both allow non-specialists to gauge risk more accurately, and hopefully reduce some of the ‘it’s their culture’ attitude. Specialist NGOs are very good at detecting risk, but this is often through years of experience, and the kind of intimate knowledge that comes with growing up with the concepts. I’m arguing that we need to develop risk models that take in the particularities of HBV, which build on this expertise, but also that to collect and analyse much more data to test and develop these on a more empirical basis.

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Still human

Women Seeking Sanctuary Advocacy Group Wales receiving the Emma Humphreys Award.

I have spent the last few weeks working on a report which looks into the problems that asylum-seeking, refugee and migrant women encounter when they are experiencing violence. All women in violent relationships face barriers to exit: they may be financially dependent, they may be psychologically beaten down by continued abuse, they may be worried about the reaction when they leave. But for a minoritised non-citizen, there are many more barriers, and many of these relate to their legal status, and the Kafkaesqu bureaucracies erected around these. Read more

Agnation, collectivity and ‘honour’

Now I’ve worked out how to use Garage Band, I can make my presentations available as podcasts as well as slidecasts. So take your pick!

What’s the difference?

Sparkle Rai

Sparkle Rai: Murdered on the orders of her father-in-law

Back in 2007, the mother-in-law and husband of Surjeet Athwal were sentenced to life for arranging for her murder in Punjab. The Surjeet case was widely described as an ‘honour’ killing in the press, on the basis that Surjeet was engaged in an affair and sought to leave her husband. One right-wing blog displayed a picture of Bachan Athwal, the mother-in-law, in traditional Sikh dress, entitled ‘Muslim Granny Kills Daugther-in-law for Honour’ above an anti-Muslim diatribe. When I attempted to correct the blogger, he informed me that Sikhism was a branch of Islam –  at which point I decided he didn’t deserve the compliment of rational opposition. Such a co-option of ‘honour’ to an anti-Muslim agenda is widespread. I will not link to Pamela Gellar but you are welcome to google her. Read more